Hiring New Employees

You would think that having a love for animals would be sufficient to work in an animal shelter; however, much of the work we deal with involves working with people. A high school level of education is sufficient, but I have watched employees struggling with simple math.

I would suggest that you offer an examination that tests applicants on people and math skills. It is not necessary that a person loves animals to be in our field, they just need to appear that they love animals in all that they do.

I always told my staff that when dealing with a person, pretend that they are talking with the Mayor. When dealing with an animal, pretend that they are dealing with my pet.

No Room for Mistakes

This afternoon, I was reminded that as humans, we are susceptible to making mistakes.  Arriving home from a drive thru, I was shorted medium size tatter tots.  Most mistakes are innocuous and cause little or no harm.

One of the greatest stresses of running an animal shelter is that you’ve entered a profession that has little room for mistakes.  Mistakes can throw off drug counts, cause the over (or under) vaccination of an animal and can even cause the death of an animal.  You cannot “undo” many of the mistakes that are available to us in this profession.  As an old carpenter would tell you, “measure twice, cut once.”  It doesn’t hurt to have three eyes on everything that you do.

There is nothing worse that to accidently euthanize an owner’s pet.  For that reason, I would not allow any animal to be euthanized until I looked at the animal and checked it against our records.  We live in a business in which there exist so many similar looking animals, that you can NEVER be too careful.

Moral Obligations

With increasing pressure to maintain high release rates, many animal shelters will fail to report prior dog bites to prospective adopters.  This became such a problem in the Commonwealth of Virginia that a law had to be enacted to force shelters to come forward with an animal’s previous aggressive history.

I experienced this myself, working in Virginia, in which volunteers would attempt to bully me and my staff into ignoring the behaviors that we witnessed, so as to keep the animal on track for adoption.  Because I felt I had a higher calling to protect the public from aggressive animals, the volunteers pushed for my removal.

I am dumbfounded by the thought process that would hide such information from a perspective adopter.  Commonsense should have prevailed in warning a person about a pet’s previous behavior.  But, when it comes to saving animals, commonsense is not so common.  Animal Advocates believe that the life of an animal is a higher priority that the safety of a person, family, or the community.

I find it extremely troubling that it was necessary to force a moral obligation on animal shelters; however, I applaud the Commonwealth for making it necessary for shelters to do the right thing.  Think of the legal ramifications and potential loss of life if shelters were allowed to continue pushing aggressive animals to people.

Staff Management – The Greatest Challenge in Shelter Management

Since the onset of social media, staff management has become more difficult.  Social media can be so vicious that shelter staff wish to maintain a positive social media presence.  Fringe groups will recognize this need for shelter staff to be accepted that they will use social media pressure to turn the staff into warriors for their group.

Prior to hiring new employees, take a look at their social media posts to see if the applicants are more concerned about doing their job, or being social media friendly.  It doesn’t hurt to be social media friendly, as long as it does not place the community at risk.

License Tags

A number of years ago, we had a dog come into the shelter wearing a dog tag; the tag was a welcome sight because very few animal wear them. The tag proved to be nearly untraceable.

The tag was from Jefferson County and failed to have the area code with the phone number. It is amazing the number of Jefferson Counties that exist.

Please, anytime you are printing an identification tag, include sufficient information, in the event that the animal is found several States away. At a minimum, include the State and area code. Please take a critical look at your tags to see if they contain sufficient information to get the animal returned home.  The tag might be the only identification on the animal and animals are known to travel with their owners over great distances.

Staff Training

The first thing removed from the budget during lean times is staff training.  It is probably the last place funds should be touched.  The best way to invest in your organization is through decent salaries and staff training.

A few days ago, the newspaper picked up on a story that animal control staff returned from a conference and wanted to implement TNR (Trap, Neuter and Release) program.  The newspaper talked like this was something new and our community would be cutting edge by trapping cats.

Communities have been performing TNR for years.  The fact that our community is starting it now only means that we are just catching up.  If we had invested in staff training years ago and had the will to manage our community cats, we would be further along to become no kill.

Conferences are the place where our staff catches up with the rest of the world.  It is important to send our best staff to training.  If you were to pick a single conference to attend, I would suggest the Animal Care Expo.

Fourth of July

As we enter the Fourth of July holiday, animal shelters throughout the country will be gearing up for an increase in shelter intakes. Pet owners seem to forget each year as to how traumatic the noise is for their pets.

Pets should be kept away from fireworks. Pets should be kept in quiet places. Pets SHOULD BE WEARING IDENTIFICATION!!!!

ID Grants

The most effective way to become no kill is to reduce your shelter intakes. One method is to find a way to get animals back to their owners BEFORE they come into the shelter. Let’s face it, very few animals running loose on our city streets are wearing any form of identification; it is the one thing pet owners fail at. Miserably!

At several locations, I obtained a grant through either the National Animal Control Association or PetSmart Charities to purchase an ID tag machine, tags, and collars. A medium sized operation can ask for $10k to $15k to last your program several years.

It is important that if you engage in an ID program, that you make sure that you place the tag on the animal prior to leaving your shelter. Experience had taught me that you cannot trust the owner to do that; they get home and put the tag on the dresser or the tag may never leave the automobile.

The purpose of the ID tag program is to give finders of lost pets a chance to call the owner prior to making the call to have the animal picked up. By reducing the intakes of owned animals, you can leave more cage space open to allow animals a longer stay for adoptions.

The tag for impounded pets should be provided free upon reclaim; otherwise, you can charge $3 to $5 per tag for additional animals.  I allowed each of my staff a free tag to learn how to use the tag machine.  This is an effective way to decrease shelter intakes.

Community Cat Programs

The biggest problem that communities face with community cat programs is that no one takes responsibly for the medical needs of the cats. It is one thing to feed a neighborhood cat, but quite another to take on the responsibility to sterilize and vaccinate those cats. Many cat owners don’t do that for their own cats, let alone cats running loose in the neighborhood.

Although feeding these neighborhood cats is a humane act; that food creates at artificially high carry capacity for the neighborhood and triggers breeding. Within a few years the neighborhood population of cats explode, resulting in complaints to animal control. Generally, animal control doesn’t care about cat problems until complaints arise and then they set about to reduce the population to zero: resetting the population for the cycle to begin again.

A few communities have active Trap, Neuter and Release (TNR) programs to attempt to bring about community wide population stability. Those programs are only as successful as the staff and funding to constantly trap fertile cats. Feral cat colonies exist within communities to attempt to maintain a population stability in small pockets; however, cat owners see those colonies as a dumping ground for their own pets when they decide to abandon them.

You might imagine that finding homes for these “wild cats” might be the biggest issue for animals shelters; but, the disease that they bring into the shelters is the biggest problem. These unvaccinated cats become stressed by trapping and relocation to the shelter that trigger the expression of disease.

It is not uncommon to read about disease outbreaks of Feline Panleukopenia in local animal shelters. These outbreaks are usually the result of animal control personnel loading the shelter with feral cats. The disease is quite contagious and will spread quickly, when people come into the shelter wanting to touch every animal.  In 2016/17, my shelter would get one outbreak under control, only to have animal control bring in more infected cats; we lived from one outbreak to another.  Having animal control and the animal shelter under one department helps the two organization into moving in the right direction.

Most people, including TNR folks, are only worried about rabies, so the other contagious diseases are not addressed in the community. People who allow their cats to go outside should vaccinate their cats as directed by their veterinarian.

Many animal shelters vaccinate animals on intake, but the onset of protection is too slow to prevent an outbreak within the shelter.  Control of shelter disease must start in the community.  A good strategy for people wanting to surrender their pets is to request that the animal is fully vaccinated 30 days prior to surrender.