Staff Management – The Greatest Challenge in Shelter Management

Since the onset of social media, staff management has become more difficult.  Social media can be so vicious that shelter staff wish to maintain a positive social media presence.  Fringe groups will recognize this need for shelter staff to be accepted that they will use social media pressure to turn the staff into warriors for their group.

Prior to hiring new employees, take a look at their social media posts to see if the applicants are more concerned about doing their job, or being social media friendly.  It doesn’t hurt to be social media friendly, as long as it does not place the community at risk.

License Tags

A number of years ago, we had a dog come into the shelter wearing a dog tag; the tag was a welcome sight because very few animal wear them. The tag proved to be nearly untraceable.

The tag was from Jefferson County and failed to have the area code with the phone number. It is amazing the number of Jefferson Counties that exist.

Please, anytime you are printing an identification tag, include sufficient information, in the event that the animal is found several States away. At a minimum, include the State and area code. Please take a critical look at your tags to see if they contain sufficient information to get the animal returned home.  The tag might be the only identification on the animal and animals are known to travel with their owners over great distances.

Staff Training

The first thing removed from the budget during lean times is staff training.  It is probably the last place funds should be touched.  The best way to invest in your organization is through decent salaries and staff training.

A few days ago, the newspaper picked up on a story that animal control staff returned from a conference and wanted to implement TNR (Trap, Neuter and Release) program.  The newspaper talked like this was something new and our community would be cutting edge by trapping cats.

Communities have been performing TNR for years.  The fact that our community is starting it now only means that we are just catching up.  If we had invested in staff training years ago and had the will to manage our community cats, we would be further along to become no kill.

Conferences are the place where our staff catches up with the rest of the world.  It is important to send our best staff to training.  If you were to pick a single conference to attend, I would suggest the Animal Care Expo.

Fourth of July

As we enter the Fourth of July holiday, animal shelters throughout the country will be gearing up for an increase in shelter intakes. Pet owners seem to forget each year as to how traumatic the noise is for their pets.

Pets should be kept away from fireworks. Pets should be kept in quiet places. Pets SHOULD BE WEARING IDENTIFICATION!!!!

ID Grants

The most effective way to become no kill is to reduce your shelter intakes. One method is to find a way to get animals back to their owners BEFORE they come into the shelter. Let’s face it, very few animals running loose on our city streets are wearing any form of identification; it is the one thing pet owners fail at. Miserably!

At several locations, I obtained a grant through either the National Animal Control Association or PetSmart Charities to purchase an ID tag machine, tags, and collars. A medium sized operation can ask for $10k to $15k to last your program several years.

It is important that if you engage in an ID program, that you make sure that you place the tag on the animal prior to leaving your shelter. Experience had taught me that you cannot trust the owner to do that; they get home and put the tag on the dresser or the tag may never leave the automobile.

The purpose of the ID tag program is to give finders of lost pets a chance to call the owner prior to making the call to have the animal picked up. By reducing the intakes of owned animals, you can leave more cage space open to allow animals a longer stay for adoptions.

The tag for impounded pets should be provided free upon reclaim; otherwise, you can charge $3 to $5 per tag for additional animals.  I allowed each of my staff a free tag to learn how to use the tag machine.  This is an effective way to decrease shelter intakes.

Community Cat Programs

The biggest problem that communities face with community cat programs is that no one takes responsibly for the medical needs of the cats. It is one thing to feed a neighborhood cat, but quite another to take on the responsibility to sterilize and vaccinate those cats. Many cat owners don’t do that for their own cats, let alone cats running loose in the neighborhood.

Although feeding these neighborhood cats is a humane act; that food creates at artificially high carry capacity for the neighborhood and triggers breeding. Within a few years the neighborhood population of cats explode, resulting in complaints to animal control. Generally, animal control doesn’t care about cat problems until complaints arise and then they set about to reduce the population to zero: resetting the population for the cycle to begin again.

A few communities have active Trap, Neuter and Release (TNR) programs to attempt to bring about community wide population stability. Those programs are only as successful as the staff and funding to constantly trap fertile cats. Feral cat colonies exist within communities to attempt to maintain a population stability in small pockets; however, cat owners see those colonies as a dumping ground for their own pets when they decide to abandon them.

You might imagine that finding homes for these “wild cats” might be the biggest issue for animals shelters; but, the disease that they bring into the shelters is the biggest problem. These unvaccinated cats become stressed by trapping and relocation to the shelter that trigger the expression of disease.

It is not uncommon to read about disease outbreaks of Feline Panleukopenia in local animal shelters. These outbreaks are usually the result of animal control personnel loading the shelter with feral cats. The disease is quite contagious and will spread quickly, when people come into the shelter wanting to touch every animal.  In 2016/17, my shelter would get one outbreak under control, only to have animal control bring in more infected cats; we lived from one outbreak to another.  Having animal control and the animal shelter under one department helps the two organization into moving in the right direction.

Most people, including TNR folks, are only worried about rabies, so the other contagious diseases are not addressed in the community. People who allow their cats to go outside should vaccinate their cats as directed by their veterinarian.

Many animal shelters vaccinate animals on intake, but the onset of protection is too slow to prevent an outbreak within the shelter.  Control of shelter disease must start in the community.  A good strategy for people wanting to surrender their pets is to request that the animal is fully vaccinated 30 days prior to surrender.

Stray Holding Time

Stray holding time is the length of time required by law for an animal shelter to legally hold a stray animal for the animal’s owner. That length of time is usually between 3 to 10 days.

Most believe that a responsible pet owner will discover that their pet is missing and go to the animal shelter within 24 hours. The truth is that even with lengthy hold times, many pet owners do not go to the shelter within the hold period. It is extremely frustrating for staff to deal with people who show up after the hold period; to deal with pet owners whose pet has been adopted or euthanized.  The frustration is further exasperated by the owners failing to recognize their role in the incident, blaming shelter staff for the failure of the owner to timely find their lost pet.

With crowded animal shelters, lengthy stray hold times burden the shelter into keeping an animal from adoption. The fact that many people surrender their pets as stray further compounds the overcrowding of the shelter while the animal is needlessly held.

Many shelters offer a two tiered holding period: one for animals with obvious signs of ownership (tag, collar, fresh grooming) and one for animals that have no indication of ownership. The most reoccurring problem that animal shelters face is owners failing to keep identification on their pets.

Many of the animal shelters, in which I worked, provided a free ID tag for animals upon reclaim. But, providing that identification appeared useless for some pet owners; we had to adopt a policy that if animal was impounded three times without identification, we would require the microchipping of the animal. We realized that the faster that we can alert an owner as to the location of their pet would help us reduce the time in which an animal is kept at the shelter and to provide additional time of other strays needing sheltering.  It is tragic that even though we provided free identification for a pet, the owner seemed to remove the identification when allowing their pet to run loose.

In one shelter, we had a three prong holding period:

  • 3 days for an animal without evidence of ownership.
  • 5 days for an animal with evidence of ownership.
  • 7 days for an animal wearing a current license (actually we would hold an animal beyond the 7 days until we make contact with the owner).  Additionally, an animal with a current license would be guaranteed medical treatment, if hit by a car while running loose.  With this three tiered system, we could boast that a current license was an insurance policy for the animal.

 

Standards of Care in Animal Shelters

In the business of animal welfare, the community will constantly armchair quarterback the policies that you create to care for your animals.  It is always a good idea to stick to standards that have been accepted throughout the animal welfare community.  It is especially useful to use standards created by the American Veterinary Association.

This document should be the cornerstone of your policies for animal care.

The Five Freedoms

As animal shelter intakes decline and the desire for increased placements, animal are being held for longer periods of time. Some animals adapt to long confinement, others do not; as such, it is necessary to maintain the Five Freedoms for each animal to make sure that our desire for higher release rates do not commit inhumane acts upon the animals in our care.

The Five Freedoms:

Freedom from hunger or thirst by ready access to fresh water and a diet to maintain full health and vigour.

Freedom from discomfort by providing an appropriate environment including shelter and a comfortable resting area.

Freedom from pain, injury or disease by prevention or rapid diagnosis and treatment.

Freedom to express (most) normal behaviour by providing sufficient space, proper facilities and company of the animal’s own kind.

Freedom from fear and distress by ensuring conditions and treatment which avoid mental suffering.